From Cavalier King Charles Spaniels to the Pembroke Corgi, The Royal Family has a long and well known love of dogs. Here's a look back at some of the best-loved canines:

Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria was a dog lover from an early age. For her 17th birthday a portrait of Dash, her beloved Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, was given to Queen Victoria as gift from her mother, The Duchess of Kent. 

When Dash died in 1840, he was buried in the grounds of Windsor Castle with the epitaph:

His attachment was without selfishness,

His playfulness without malice,

His fidelity without deceit,

READER, if you would live beloved and die regretted, profit by the example of DASH.

Queen Victoria married fellow dog lover Prince Albert in 1840. He arrived in England for his wedding with the greyhound Eos - who also joined them on their honeymoon.

During the 1840s a new type of dog arrived from Coburg, Germany - the dachshund. Deckel the dachshund arrived in England in 1845 and became the first dachshund to hold a strong place in The Queen's affections.

However, it was Waldman VI (centre of the photo below) who became known as 'the very favourite dachshund of Queen Victoria'.

Waldman the dachshund at Windsor Castle

In the 1860s and 70s, Queen Victoria became fond of smooth haired Collies - she owned 88 in her lifetime. There are many photographs showing Queen Victoria with her favourite Collie, Sharp. The photo below became a 'carte-de-visite' which was widely published and sold to the public like a postcard. 

On the 3rd April 1866, The Queen wrote in her journal, 'I was photographed alone with my faithful Sharp.'

Queen Victoria with Sharp the collie

After ascending to the throne in 1837, The Queen became the RSPCA Patron and in 1885 Battersea Dogs Home Patron. Prince Leopold, The Queen's son, also adopted a fox terrier called Skippy from Battersea Dogs home.

One the most unusual of Queen Victoria's dogs was Looty the Pekingese. Looty was brought over from China after a war by Captain John Harte Dunne, who noted that Looty was was 'a most affectionate and intelligent little creature – it has always been accustomed to be treated as a pet and it was with the hope that it might be looked upon as such by Her Majesty and the Royal Family that I have brought it from China'. 

Looty the pekingese

As the first Pekingese in Britain, Looty was photographed on several occasions, becoming quite the celebrity.

Edward VII

When The Prince of Wales, Edward VII preferred terriers, but he acquired numerous others throughout his life. In 1886, he was given a Samoyed by the German Chancellor Otto von Bismarck.

Edward VII with a Samoyed

The King's favourite dog was Irish Terrier Jack, who suddenly died during a visit to Ireland in 1903. His epitaph reads:

"Here lies Jack, King Edward's favourite Irish Terrier who only lived twelve hours after reaching his native land. He died at Viceregal Lodge on July 21 1903."

Edward VII's most famous dog was terrier Caesar, who went onto accompany The King everywhere - including meetings with politicians. AfterThe King's death in 1910 Caesar very poignantly walked behind the coffin his dead master.

Caesar walks behind the coffin of Edward VII

Edward VII's wife, Queen Alexandra also loved dogs. Although she often chose small breeds, she became well known for keeping Borzoi's.

The first Borzoi's in the Royal Family were probably the pair Vassilka and Alex, who were presented by Tsar Alexander III of Russia.

Queen Alexandra with Alex the Borzoi

Following the death of King Edward VII in 1910, the Sandringham kennels remained under the care and guidance of Queen Alexandra.

George V

King George V had five dogs during his reign that were his personal pets. His first was collie, Heather, who is featured in the photograph below.

George V and Queen Mary with collie Heather

The photograph was taken at St James's Palace and also features Queen Mary, which was unusual and it wasn't common to find such large dogs indoor at this time.

Following Heather's death, the King acquired Happy – the first of the four terriers he was to own; Jack, Snip and Bob.

George VI

King George VI owned a number of Labradors as gun dogs and pets. He was particularly fond of yellow Labradors, which were still relatively uncommon in the early 20th century.

George, when The Duke of York, acquired the first Royal corgi, Dookie, in 1933. Shortly after Dookie, a second Corgi, Jane, arrived. Jane had two puppies in 1938: Crackers and Carol. Crackers lived to be almost 14 and was a favourite of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother.

King George VI and corgi

The photo above was taken as part of George VI's and The Queen Mother's silver wedding anniversary celebrations.

Elizabeth II

In 1944, the then Princess Elizabeth was given Susan the corgi as a birthday present. Since then all The Queen's corgi's have descended from Susan.

The Queen with her corgis at Windsor Castle

The Queen continues to be photographed with her corgis, and her love of dogs remains strong as ever.

You find out more about Royal Dogs in the Royal Collection Trust's Book 'Noble Hounds and Dear Companions', which is available to read free online here.