The Princess Royal celebrates the 'Edinburgh Seven'

Published 12 September 2019
The Princess Royal honours seven women who were prevented from graduating as doctors 150 years ago

The Princess Royal, Chancellor of The University of Edinburgh, last night honoured seven women who were prevented from graduating as doctors 150 years ago.

The Princess Royal unveils a plaque at The University of Edinburgh in honour of the Edinburgh Seven

The pioneers, known as the ‘Edinburgh Seven’, were the first women admitted to study medicine in Britain when they enrolled in 1869 but they faced prejudice and were prevented from graduating.

The Princess Royal honours the Edinburgh Seven

The campaign started by the Seven led to the UK Medical Act 1876, which meant that all individuals 'without distinction of sex' could be registered as medical professionals. 

The Princess Royal honours the Edinburgh Seven, whose campaigning led to the passing of the UK Medical Act 1876

In July, the Edinburgh Seven - Sophia Jex-Blake, Isabel Thorne, Edith Pechey, Matilda Chaplin, Helen Evans, Mary Anderson Marshall and Emily Bovell - were awarded honorary degrees on the 150th anniversary of their matriculation at the University of Edinburgh.

Last night, The Princess Royal met a group of current students at Edinburgh Medical School who collected the posthumous degrees on their behalf.

The Princess Royal meets Edinburgh Medical School students who collected the honorary posthumous degrees for the Edinburgh Seven

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