Published 19 October 2017

The Troop also known as the 'Gunners' was formed on the wishes of The Queen's father, King George VI, 70 years ago. 

On the occasion of their 70th Anniversary, The Queen, Captain General, today reviewed The King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery (KTRHA) in London's Hyde Park. Formed on the wishes of her father King George VI in October 1947, The Queen declared that the name 'The King's Troop' would remain in his honour on her accession to the throne.

Now commonly known as the ‘Gunners’, The Royal Artillery provides firepower to the British Army, but are also key in ceremonial salutes for Royal occasions and state functions – notably in the funerals of both King George VI and Winston Churchill.

Today, The Queen saw soldiers demonstrating excellent equestrianism during the parade across the park. However, the Troop are also a fighting force, deployed on operations around the world when required.

During today's Review, The Queen ascended to the dias and was received by the Royal Salute. Afterwards, Her Majesty was accompanied by the Master Gunner and Honorary Colonel into the State Review Range Rover to inspect the parade closer.

Following the Parade, Her Majesty attended a reception to meet soldiers and veterans of the Troop, including Percy Austen who was served in 1947 when King George VI inspected the Parade.

The Queen also met the first female Master Saddler and Master Tailor.  Uniquely for the British Army, this Troop is currently 50/50 male and female. 

The Queen was also re-introduced to Her Majesty's former race horse 'Knock Castle', which was gifted to the Troop in August of this year and is currently training to become one of the 'Gunner' horses.

The Queen has been Captain General of The Royal Regiment of Artillery since 6 February 1952.