Published 14 December 2014

These men and women would no longer be defined by their injuries but as competitors, athletes and team mates.

The Duke of Sussex

This summer over 400 inspirational men and women from around the world came together in London to compete in the inaugural Invictus games - A sporting competition for those injured while serving in the Armed Forces.

We hoped the games would provide some of those taking part with a stepping stone to elite sport, but for most, it would mark the end of a chapter and the beginning of a new one. We should not underestimate the power of sport to change lives.

Each of those taking part had endured a long, and often painful, journey of recovery - for some that journey continues. All of those who competed in the games had achieved so much in just making it to the start line.

The example they set showed us the very best in human spirit; vividly demonstrating what can be achieved post injury, if you have the will. These men and women would no longer be defined by their injuries but as competitors, athletes and team mates.

In truth, they had also come together to say thank you. Thank you to their families, friends, carers and to the general public for the unwavering support they have received throughout their recovery. They also came to remember those who were not so lucky.

Their stories move, humble and inspire us, perfectly encapsulating the essence of this award for outstanding achievement in the face of adversity - they are Invictus.