Published 6 July 2017

The Queen, accompanied by The Duke of Edinbugh, has spent the week visiting various regions in Scotland, meeting Scots from all walks of life and hosting thousands at the Palace of Holyoodhouse in recognition of their good work.

This is known in Scotland as 'Royal Week', and to others as 'Holyrood Week', and is a chance to celebrate Scottish culture, achievement and community.

The Palace of Holyroodhouse is the official residence of the Monarchy in Scotland. Originally built as a Monastery in 1128, a Palace was built by King James IV of Scotland in 1501.

Holyrood weeks always begins on the forecourt of Holyroodhouse with the traditional 'Ceremony of the Keys' - where The Queen is officially welcomed to the city of Edinburgh.

The Queen was presented with the keys to the city of Edinburgh by the Lord Provost. Her Majesty then returned the keys saying:

I return these keys, being perfectly convinced that they cannot be placed in better hands than those of the Lord Provost and Councillors of my good City of Edinburgh.

This year the Guard of Honour was provided by the Balaklava Company, The Argyll and Sunderland Highlanders, 5th Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland (5SCOTS), of which The Queen is Colonel-in-Chief.

The next day started in the Great Gallery of the Palace of Holyroodhouse, The Queen hosted an Investiture to award Scottish residents who have made a significant contribution to their society.

In the afternoon, The Queen, accompanied by The Duke of Edinburgh and The Duke of York, hosted a Garden Party in the grounds of Holyroodhouse.

The Holyrood Week Garden Party is an opportunity to reward those who serve their communities all across Scotland.

The following day, The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh went to Stirling to visit Scotland's newest section of canal – which has been officially named the 'Queen Elizabeth II Canal'.

The new Helix project features the iconic and internationally acclaimed, 30-metre-high 'Kelpies' sculpture, which have transformed the local area.

The Queen and The Duke also had the opportunity to meet staff and volunteers at the new visitor centre.

Later that day, Her Majesty, accompanied by The Duke, paid a visit to Stirling Castle to commemorate Her Majesty's 70 years as Colonel-in-Chief of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Stirling Castle is home to the Argyll and Sutherland Regimental Museum, where the illustrious history of the Regiment is displayed alongside the many personal stories of the Officers, soldiers and their families.

Throughout Holyrood Week The Queen has hosted a number of audiences with politicians and leaders from the UK and the Commonwealth.

In Perthshire, The Queen officially opened the new Highland Spring factory building. The extension houses a new, state-of-the-art production line, which is the fastest and most technologically advanced in the UK.

In the new bottling hall, Her Majesty officially started the new production line, before meeting staff and line operators.

Meanwhile, The Duke of Edinburgh hosted Duke of Edinburgh Award Gold Presentations at the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

The Duke founded the Award scheme in 1956 and they have since become the world's leading youth achievement award.

To mark the end of Holyrood Week, The Queen presented Royal Medals at the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE).

The Queen, who is the RSE Patron, instituted the Royal Medal to mark the Millennium, and are awarded for distinction and international repute in the following categories: Life Sciences, Physical and Engineering Sciences, Art, Humanities and Social Sciences & Business and Commerce.