In 1960, The Queen adopted a personal flag to be flown on any building, ship, car or aircraft in which she was staying or travelling.

The Royal Standard represents not only the Sovereign but also the United Kingdom, whereas The Queen's own flag is personal to her alone and can be flown by no one other than The Queen.

The Queen's personal flag consists of the initial 'E' ensigned with the Royal crown, surrounded by a chaplet of roses.

The design is in gold (or yellow) on a blue field and the flag is fringed with gold (or yellow).

Since its introduction, the flag's use has been altered. Although it is not a 'Head of Commonwealth' flag, it has in effect become The Queen's personal Commonwealth flag. It is flown to mark her presence in non-monarchical Commonwealth countries and in realms that have not adopted a personal flag specifically for The Queen.

Some realms have adopted their own versions of the flag to be flown as a personal flag when The Queen is in their country, each one incorporating the country's arms with The Queen's personal design. The Queen's personal flag is also flown on a number of Commonwealth occasions in the United Kingdom.

In addition to his standard as Prince of Wales, the Prince has a personal flag exclusively for use in Wales. The flag is based on the Arms of the Principality of Wales, also known as the Arms of Llewelyn ap Gruffydd, the last native Prince of Wales.

The flag was flown for the first time on June 11, 1969 - three weeks before The Prince's Investiture - at Castle Green, Cardiff, for the inauguration of the Royal Regiment of Wales, of which The Prince is Colonel-in-Chief.

During the Investiture ceremony on 1 July 1969, the Standard for Wales was flown from Caernarfon Castle's Eagle Tower.

The Prince of Wales also has a personal banner for his use in Scotland, based on his Scottish titles - Duke of Rothesay, Lord of the Isles and Great Steward of Scotland.

It consists of four quarterings. The first and third feature a blue and white chequered band across a gold background, representing the Great Steward of Scotland, whilst the second and fourth quarterings show a black galley on a white background, representing the Lord of the Isles. A small shield in the centre shows the lions rampant, representing the dukedom of Rothesay.

Other children of the Sovereign have flags which feature the Scottish version of the Royal Standard, bearing heraldic 'labels' or differences to distinguish each Royal individual.