St George's Chapel is a place of worship for The Queen and the Royal Family as well as a church serving the local community. Built by kings, shaped by the history of the Royal Family and still the location for both splendid  Royal events and private family moments, find out more about this most Royal of chapels

The building of the Chapel

The construction of the Chapel was begun in 1475 by Edward IV and completed by Henry VIII in 1528. 

An interior photograph of the chapel, taken in the late 19th century

The architecture represents one of the finest examples of 'Perpendicular Gothic' style in the country.

Over the years, the interior of the Chapel has developed to commemorate key figures in Royal history and the history of the Chapel: the octagonal Bray Chapel is named after Sir Reginald Bray, friend of Henry VIII and benefactor of the Chapel; the simple tomb of Henry VI was once the focus of pilgrimages, and one of the oriel windows of Edward IV's Chantry Chapel (below) was enlarged and reconstructed by Henry VIII so that Catherine of Aragon could watch the Order of the Garter services from it.

One of the oriel windows of Edward IV's Chantry Chapel © St George's Chapel

These are just a few examples of the rich history of the building, the figures who built it and the family who retain a very personal link to it to this day.

View a timeline illustrating the history of the Chapel on the St George's Chapel website. 

Weddings in the Chapel

The Chapel has been the scene of many Royal marriages, in particular from the reign of Queen Victoria onwards.

The marriage of The Princess Margaret of Connaught and The Crown Prince of Sweden and Norway at St George's Chapel on 15 June 1905. Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

The most recent Royal weddings include those of Peter Philips (son of the Princess Royal) and Autumn Phillips in 2008, and The Earl and Countess of Wessex in 1999.

The marriage of The Earl and Countess of Wessex. © Press Association

Find out more about Royal weddings in Windsor.

Royal burials in the Chapel

Ten former Sovereigns are buried in St George's Chapel. Five are in two burial vaults beneath the choir; the other five are in tombs in the Chapel, including The Queen's father, the late King on the George VI memorial Chapel.

A tomb in the Rutland Chapel. Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

A full list of Royal burials and funerals in the Chapel can be found on the St George's Chapel website

The Chapel and the Order of the Garter

St George's is the Chapel of the Order of the Garter. In June there is usually a special service attended by The Queen and the other Knights and Ladies of the Order, who include other members of the Royal Family.

Each year, The Queen and other members of the Royal Family attend a service for the Order of the Garter at St George's Chapel. Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

On each side of the choir are the beautifully carved stalls of the Knights and Ladies of the Garter, constructed between 1478 and 1495. Above the stalls are the helmets, crests and banners of the present Knights and Ladies. 

The choir stalls. Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018

Photographs: Royal Collection Trust/© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2018, Press Association and St George's Chapel.